Another great review by Linda G

Thank you Linda. You’re a sweetheart x

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Author interview with David Six

 

 

Welcome all.

Hi again. Another week, another interview. This week I’ve had the pleasure of speaking to David Six. He’s not your usual man. He’s like Aragorn, or Randall Flagg, with many names from many places.

Hi David, thank you for agreeing to this interview. Tell us a little about yourself and your background?

1. When did you first realize that you wanted to become a writer?

Since I was a five and wrote a story about getting “red” of a mouse in our house. I later learned from my parents that there was a homonym that made my story make better sense!

2. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I enjoy telling stories, and people are kind enough to read them. Writing about what goes on inside of people—the light, and the shadow—fascinates me, and writing mystery/suspense is a natural progression for me.

3. Which writers inspire you?

Stephen King, Tami Hoag, Patricia Cornwell, Elmore Leonard, Kathy Reichs are some of my current favourites.

4. So, what have you written?

I’ve been published under two other pen names in different genres. The two constant and entwined elements in everything I write—no matter the genre—is character and suspense.

5. What are you working on at the minute?

I have a couple of obligations in the other genres to complete, and while that’s happening, I’m plotting a mystery/suspense novel involving serial killers and religion, which I hope to release in early 2017.

6. Why do you write?

It gives my fingers something to do.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

Usually they just pop into my head when I am thinking of two seemingly unrelated things. When that happens, those two things suddenly join hands, and the idea germinates into a story.

8. Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?

I’m a “pantser”, mostly (as in, writing by the seat of). I use OneNote to jot story ideas and character stats, and use it to keep track of everything happening in the story. I always have the broad strokes in my head, but follow the characters around to see where they lead me for their individual moments.

9. How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

I’ve become more seasoned. With age comes a certain comfort in one’s own skin, and not caring overmuch what others may think. This is freeing especially in writing, as what comes into my head goes onto the screen. Some readers may love what you write, while others are offended to the point that they rend their garments. That’s okay; there’s lots of other authors out there for them to hunt up.

Sitting down and stringing words together is always hard work, but it’s a gift that I get to play with every day.

10. What are the hardest and easiest things about writing?

I guess that depends on the day. Some days it may be not clearly hearing what the characters are trying to say—that makes it hard. Other days, they may chatter nonstop, and that does make it easier, though my fingers sometimes have a difficult time keeping up with them!

11. Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

My favorites are largely the same as the ones in #3. And yes, I read every day. Other writers are teachers, and the ones I mentioned essentially present “master classes” on writing well, in every one of their books.

12. What would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing against being published or the other way around?

Trad pubbing gives an author a security blanket that they are being taken care of, though from what I’m hearing lately, only upper-list authors are still getting that special treatment. Mids and lower have to do some—or a lot— of their own editing, marketing, social media, etc. Traditional publishing gives an author a certain cachet with readers, but I think—with the rise of Kindle—that is no longer as powerful a scent as it used to be. And authors that begin as indies—Hugh Howey comes to mind—can be picked up by the trads.

Self-pubbing takes a lot of one’s time, no doubt about that—it’s pretty much a 24/7/365 kind of job. The upside is being in control of your own destiny: you pub your books when you want, and you don’t have to wait for a company in New York to get to you. You get the cover design you like. You make your own edits, or find your own editor to help you. You get greater royalties.

The downside is the same as the upside: that you are in control of your destiny. If you fail, it’s all on you; you can’t blame an agent, or an editor, or a publisher.

13. Do you have any advice for other budding authors?

I’ve been asked this many times. And I have to give the reply that I’ve seen other authors give: sit down and write. No magic formula exists. Someone may hit it big on the first book, while others toil in obscurity for years. Everyone has heard the story of J.K. Rowling’s first Potter book being rejected something like a dozen times. You have to power through that. If you really are committed to writing, you’ll write. Stephen King has a quote I quite like: “Amateurs wait for inspiration. The rest of us get to work.”

14. How do you relax?

I read. I do yoga. I watch Netflix or Hulu—their original shows, where the sanitizing censorship of the broadcast networks hasn’t reached. I’ve been told I write with a “cinematic” sense, and I do tend to visual scenes in an action-oriented way, as I might see them on the large or small screen. Seeing how other writers do that is always inspiring.

And of course I take Liz out for fun times when we are both able to get away from our computers!

15. What is your favourite book and why?

That changes over the passing of time. Most recently, my favorite would be “Mr. Mercedes”, by Stephen King. King gives very little physical description of his characters, and yet they seem to come right off the page, fully-fleshed and breathing. His skill at characterization is extraordinary.

Thanks so much for giving me the opportunity to chat with you. I hope your readers enjoy it!

Thank you David for an insight into your worlds. Please check out his links below:

http://www.authordavidsix.com/

 

Author interview with Tiffany DuBeau

Hi All

Another week another interview. This week  it’s my pleasure to be interviewing Tiffany DuBeau, author of Lotus, due this fall.

Serendipitous writer, mother, and animal lover, changing the world one word at a time. Living on Canada’s east coast with her partner, daughter and two cats, Tiffany likes to spend her time at the ocean’s edge, adding to her blanket collection, scouring the racks at thrift shops, planting food with her little pixie, and of course, playing with words!

Before graduating from the Atlantic Flight Attendant Academy in 2006, and moving to Alberta to begin her electrical apprenticeship in 2009, Tiffany carelessly navigated the muddy waters of her  traumatic childhood and rebellious adolescent years. In 2011, she moved home, expecting her first child, and dove headfirst into writing her story. She shared her experiences on her late blog, Serendipity, as a means to overcome and move on from her tribulations. Humbled by thousands of views and tremendous feedback, Tiffany knew this was only the beginning.

Aspiring to touch the hearts of those who struggle with letting go of the past, her first book, Lotus, due out in the fall of 2016, is a true story based on her experiences growing up and how her choices were directly related to harrowing events in her life. Tiffany aims to show you how to love yourself, overcome your past and be the best you possible.

Hi Tiffany, thank you for agreeing to this interview. As you’ve already given us an insight into who you are (blankets and pixies), shall we get straight into the interview:

 

1. When did you first realize that you wanted to become a writer?

I have been writing for as long as I can remember. It started with apology stories I would write to my mom when I was in trouble. Scratched in crayon on any scrap of paper I could find. I would slip it under the door and wait for her to pick it up. With my ear pressed against the door, as soon as I heard her snicker, I knew I was off the hook. I knew I wanted to become a writer when I realized my words were powerful, even at age five. Writing has always been my most positive outlet; short stories, poems, you name it. I have always felt like I could effectively express myself with writing as opposed to speaking or other art forms. It’s my passion, I am harnessing it now and I have never felt so liberated.

2. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I hope to continue writing for a living. I am already working on my next novel and have several stories floating around in my brain, dying to be heard. I am starting to touch on the idea of freelance and ghost writing as well. The entire industry is so vast, I am so green. All I know is I love writing. When you partner your passions with your ways of life, only good things can happen.

3. Which writers inspire you?

My number one inspiration is Robin Sharma, who is also a Nova Scotian! He has such inspiring words. He redefines success and through his works, I have been enlightened and inspired to document my own journey and to guide those who need help.

4. So, what have you written?

I have an abundance of poems that I have written since a young girl. I started a blog a few years ago, which actually has turned into my first book, Lotus, due this fall! It is a self-help book designed to help you let go of your past and truly love yourself. I may or may not have written product descriptions for adult toys back in 2009. It was a fly-by-night gig that I really don’t have the proof to back up my contribution but I will never forget being walked in on staring at a row of dildos in my office!

5. What are you working on at the minute?

While Lotus is in production, I am working on an erotic thriller, a sci-fi/ new world story, and a sci-fi thriller.

6. Why do you write?

I write because I love to tell stories. I have read so many books that I have gotten completely lost in; I want to be on the other side of the page now. I want to get people lost in my stories. I want to create characters that people fall in love with, or absolutely despise. It is so fun imagining and creating this completely

different world to get inside people’s heads. I am also terrible at speaking lol. My words sound way better on paper than they do coming from my mouth.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

I have quite an active and vivid imagination. I find myself in weird situations, the wheels start moving and all of a sudden a whole story is weaving itself in my head. For example, my erotic thriller definitely has some truthful scenarios, perhaps my way of getting back at my “victims” 😉 I also feel like I have different personalities or characters, when I write, I get to be them for a little while. It’s extremely satisfying.

8. Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?

I am definitely more of a “just start writing, it will flow naturally” kind of writer. I am toying with the idea of an outline and a plot for the next one. However, inspiration strikes me at the weirdest times so it’s hard to plan for that. I find it difficult to sit down and force this stuff out. I much rather prefer just getting it all out first and then organizing later.

9. How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

I have definitely evolved into a more mature writer since I really started to understand what was happening with me. I used to write with a lot of pain but through that painful writing, I have had a lot of revelations and can use writing for other things to constantly improve my skills.

10. What is the hardest and easiest things about writing?

The hardest thing about writing, so far in my experience, is believing in your capabilities and accepting constructive criticism. It is a tough industry and it’s even tougher swallowing your pride to take heat from critics. The easiest thing? Coming up with the ideas. I will never be able to tell all the stories I want to tell in this lifetime.

11. Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I do read quite often, I usually have a couple of books on the go at once. As mentioned before, my favourite author is Robin Sharma. But I do enjoy JK Rowling, James Rollins, Paul Doherty, Joe Abercrombie, and John Connolly to name a few.

12. What would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing against being published or the other way around?

I see benefits for both publishing options. I decided to self-publish Lotus because it’s a very personal story and I wanted to have complete control over it. In the future, I will definitely consider traditional publishing.

13. Do you have any advice for other budding authors?

Just write. Never stop writing. Even if your work flops. To me, it isn’t a business, it’s a way of life and you can never give up on your way of life. I can’t say it enough, just write!

14. How do you relax?

I am a beach bum and fortunate to live next to the Atlantic so there’s nothing that soothes my soul more than sand, salt water and sunshine.

15. What is your favourite book and why?

My favourite book is The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, by Robin Sharma. It is a remarkable tale of a hot-shot lawyer who has a heart attack in a crowded courtroom and has this revelation that there is so much more to life than material possessions. So, as the title suggests, he sells his Ferrari, ventures to the Himalayas and lives with monks for some time. I first read the book when I was 16; my late grandmother leant it to me and I have read it about 6 times more since then. Incredible, eye-opening lessons in this book that are applicable to everyone.

Wow! Thanks for the interview. I will be definitely buying a copy of Lotus, and keeping an eye out for all future works, especially the erotic thriller!

There are exciting things a’ happening on the east coast of Canada. Check out all things Tiffany to keep up to date. Below are her links:

https://tiffanydubeau.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/tiffanyddubeau/

@TiffanyDuBeau

 

 

My review of Awakening

Awakening (Promiscus Guardians Book 1)
by Brianna West (Goodreads Author)

47917749

Phil Price‘s review

Jul 09, 2016  · 


I picked this book after spotting it advertised on social media. It’s not your everyday paranormal romance. A young woman, plodding through a meaningless existence, suddenly gets acquainted with supernatural beings. Izzy then discovers that she too is not your average human. She is special. So special in fact, that Dark forces are after her.

An interesting story that would ordinarily have enough going on to keep the reader turning the pages. What makes this book different is how West brings it to life. Forget the plot and the majority of the charters, this is a book about Izzy. In a world of sullen hero’s and pouty divas, we are introduced to Izzy. a self deprecating woman, with low self esteem, prone to donut consumption. The book is about how she reacts to being plunged into a crazy world, filled with vampires and demons. She was a joy to be with. Hilarious at times, but also caring and loving too. West brings this character to life with such skill and ease. Maybe there is a small slice of the author in the character. I sincerely hope so. I look forward to reading more stories from this talented writer. Superbly done.